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ihatethemedia:

dzhoslibrarian:

ihatethemedia:

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Oh, irony.

Hilarious on so many levels for the obvious reasons but the hidden gems take the dub. Members of the tumblr society in full regalia:

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And ihatethemedia was overlooked! She needs her own special installment of image

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Staying out of the drama, but this is the funniest thing I’ve seen on here holy shit.

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Soooo…

I like you guys…

I will be “following” (that just feels weird to say) some of you on my other “blog” (I’d hardly call it that), which I check more often than this one.

So if you get a follow by the name of “mytruenorthstretch"… please do not be alarmed… it’s just your friendly neighbor curious…

& don’t feel like you have to follow me back, it has nothing to do w/ Tsarnaev stuff.  Just pictures I like & the occasional song.

K thanks peace :)

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Anonymous asked: I don't think it has as much to do with "knowing right from wrong" as it does with how easily someone immature and young could be convinced to do something terrible without fully thinking it through. When you're 19 you're highly impressionable, I think people are sort of missing the point with the whole "right or wrong" aspect of this.

dzhoslibrarian:

curious-observations:

dzhoslibrarian:

I agree with you on this as well, but I still stand by my other arguments. Anon, you make an excellent point. I just wish you had made it on the original thread. My inbox is filling up with asks that splinter the discussion into a bunch of fragments. :(

I totally agree with you and this anon, I think chopping it up to a right vs. wrong argument is far too simplistic.  Sure, he could have known it was wrong, & I’m sure he did, but it’s his comprehension of the potential consequences that factoring in his age, (& thus, the “typical” maturity level of that age/ brain) becomes important.  

Would knowing it was wrong be enough to stop him? Somehow, I doubt it. I’m sure he did know it was wrong, and yet he still (allegedly) did it.

Would he have done knowing the extent of the damage and destruction he’d cause?  Who his victims would be? What would happen to his brother? What would happen to him? How it would affect his family?  Generating such forecasts usually only comes from a well-developed and mature brain, but typical 19 year olds (esp. boys) aren’t exactly known for their skills in “thinking ahead”. & for all intents and purposes, Dzhokhar seemed like a pretty “typical” 19 year old.

^^^ Yes, I agree. I love the phrase “generating such forecasts.” I do not believe for one second that he genuinely thought about or was able to foresee the outcomes. All he was thinking about was making a point,  sticking it to the U.S. government. If he had thought about any of those other things, I do not think the BMB would have occurred. It’s possible they would have, but I have a hard time believing he ever went in thinking about where he is sitting right now. I seriously wonder if he had even heard of ADX Florence, either. Somehow I doubt it.

Yes! I’m glad I made sense… & I feel the same way about everything you mentioned.  I have a feeling he probably had some sort of tunnel vision about what he wanted to accomplish, what he thought the end game would be, but had he known or really thought about the consequences, he wouldn’t have done it (or at least have had a better plan in place).  I also don’t think in a million years he could have predicted that his brother would die and he’d be left to face all the consequences alone. I really wonder how that’s settling with him… & I too doubt he had ever heard of ADX, I hadn’t even heard of it before this case.

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Anonymous asked: I don't think it has as much to do with "knowing right from wrong" as it does with how easily someone immature and young could be convinced to do something terrible without fully thinking it through. When you're 19 you're highly impressionable, I think people are sort of missing the point with the whole "right or wrong" aspect of this.

dzhoslibrarian:

I agree with you on this as well, but I still stand by my other arguments. Anon, you make an excellent point. I just wish you had made it on the original thread. My inbox is filling up with asks that splinter the discussion into a bunch of fragments. :(

I totally agree with you and this anon, I think chopping it up to a right vs. wrong argument is far too simplistic.  Sure, he could have known it was wrong, & I’m sure he did, but it’s his comprehension of the potential consequences that factoring in his age, (& thus, the “typical” maturity level of that age/ brain) becomes important.  

Would knowing it was wrong be enough to stop him? Somehow, I doubt it. I’m sure he did know it was wrong, and yet he still (allegedly) did it.

Would he have done knowing the extent of the damage and destruction he’d cause?  Who his victims would be? What would happen to his brother? What would happen to him? How it would affect his family?  Generating such forecasts usually only comes from a well-developed and mature brain, but typical 19 year olds (esp. boys) aren’t exactly known for their skills in “thinking ahead”. & for all intents and purposes, Dzhokhar seemed like a pretty “typical” 19 year old.

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Anonymous asked: I don't agree that a 19yr old is a full fledged adult, nor do I agree with using a Queen (who had been trained since birth to be a Queen, btw) and 2 geniuses to be a fair comparison. Talk to 19yr olds now and tell me they are ALL fully adults, we raise our kids in this day and age in a way that relieves them of responsibility and keeps them being young for a lot longer than in the old days. Of course not all 19yr olds are immature but a lot are, and guilty or not, he easily could be one of them.

dzhoslibrarian:

josemourinho-:

dzhoslibrarian:

weanonthings:

somethingreallyirrelevant:

I personally disagree that Dzhokhar was immature, but we can agree to disagree on that seeing as we may be interpreting things differently. However, the important thing here is that immature or not, you simply cannot expect me to believe that a 19-year-old does not know and understand that committing a bombing is legally and morally wrong. If guilty, he can and should be held completely accountable for that decision. He was old enough to know better and to step out of his own accord if he’d wanted to. Clearly, if guilty, he made his choice and that was to participate.

When I was 19, I knew that.

Anon, I agree with you. Just because some 18 and 19 year olds are mature does not mean all or even most are. I was not mature at 19, that’s for sure. I did many stupid things, few of which I care to share here.

I feel the same way. I don’t really know the full story or study behind this, I guess it’s something to look into, but I remember learning that a critical part of the male’s brain isn’t fully developed until they’re like 25 or 26. For me, 18-25 is experimenting and finding yourself. At least, I hope I’m not going to be making the same mistakes at 30 that I did at 19. That doesn’t at all excuse what he’s being accused of (which is way more than a “mistake”), but it’s just really difficult (for me) to see the clear-cut line between juvenile and adult.

^^^ Yes. The brain development process you’re referring to is called myelination or myelinogenesis. Recent peer-reviewed research (the gold standard in science, for those reading this who don’t know that)  indicates it may not be complete in males until the age of 28. It’s usually complete in females somewhat earlier.

Myelination affects judgment, reasoning, and ability to predict complex outcomes. It’s not complete in 18 year old males. Just because they are legally considered to be adults does not mean that they are able to exercise the same level of judgment that a 30 year old would. Even the automotive insurance industry recognizes this difference in developmental judgment — that’s why people 25 and under pay much higher rates for car insurance. They’re statistically far more likely to cause and be in accidents.

^^

Also, the frontal lobe (the area of the brain responsible for planning, decision making, and consequence weighing) is the last region of the brain to mature, for males that usually doesn’t happen until mid to late 20s, I too definitely don’t think Dzhokhar could be considered an “adult”, theoretically, not legally. (hell, I’m 22 and don’t think of myself as fully an “adult”)  Most 18-24 year olds feel more comfortable with calling themselves “emerging adults”, here’s an article that explains that really well.

There’s also the invincibility fable (which I think had a lot to do with Dzhokhar’s decision making) that could have contributed to his poor judgment.

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patsysvodka:

Gym Owner Talks Tsarnaev, Todashev

John Allan, owner of the gym where Tamerlan Tsarnaev & Ibragim Todashev trained, talks about his infamous former regulars.

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Very interesting…

(via trackingtagssucks)

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somethingreallyirrelevant:

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All I meant by “classic” terrorist is the typical profile - like how there’s always a more or less typical criminal profile, but there can be wide variance from that. I could have probably worded that better, lol, and I didn’t mean for it to come off sounding stereotyped.

There…

What I’m struggling with when trying to fit Dzhokhar into a “typical” criminal-profile is that for him… I don’t know maybe it’s a misleading gut feeling… but I just kind of doubt the depth behind of those statements, the boat note and FBI comment.  If they are real, and what we’ve read is exact to what he actually said/wrote, to me they just sound really generic and simplistic. As if he was just regurgitating things he was told or heard.  I just wonder if those are really his words, from his heart, or phrases he’s just repeating or paraphrasing.  It’s just, from reading other murder’s/criminal’s/terrorist’s direct confessions/manifestos explaining their actions/motives, you get the sense that they put a lot of heart and honesty into them.  They’re very eloquent and specific, very passionate in their reasonings, and I just don’t get that sense from Dzhokhar’s supposed confession. The way they were worded… they just sound too basic, superficial even, than what you’d expect from a “typical” terrorist.  To me, those confessions make him sound more like an assistant/accomplice/associate (I can’t find the right word & none of these sound right), which is why I just can’t think of him as a “typical” terrorist (mindset-wise, not action-wise). I know I’m not wording this the way I want to & I feel like I’m not making any sense… sorry :(  

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whylike:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324492604579083040654421528.html#project%3Drecovery0920%26articleTabs%3Dinteractive

Struggles of Boston Amputees Mount
As Limelight Fades, Some Victims Feel Pressure to Be Resilient for Boston


“When I got these legs, I was almost expecting a miracle,” Mrs. Corcoran said. “But it’s still so hard, so hard.”

(via callinoutthejaharfangirls)

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somethingreallyirrelevant:

justice4dzhokhar:

A supporter, Sharon Winchester Jackson (real last name Womack), who is also an admin of several groups, recently posted that she had been harassed by the police because she was a supporter in the Free Jahar Movement. She stated that police bust into her home, guns drawn to serve a search warrant…

Reblogging to make sure my supporter followers see this.

I think it’s very important to understand that you do not need to be afraid of law enforcement taking any sort of action against you just for being part of a community like this, or for supporting Dzhokhar. It is a free country and you cannot be charged or have any sort of legal action taken against you for your views alone, no matter what those views are.

Thank you so much for posting this, justice4dzhokhar.

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huhandfrown:

I just wish that some of you on here could stop with your psycho-anaylises of Dzhokhar and/or Tamerlan because according to a professional, licensed psychologists and psychiatrist, ONE CAN ONLY KNOW THE FACTS CONCERNING THEIR MENTAL STATE AFTER INTERVIEWING THEM. Everything else is just…

Those of us who study psychology have no problem acknowledging that most of it IS speculation. This doesn’t need to be pointed out to us.

"a professional, licensed psychologists and psychiatrist" would be the only qualified person to clinically diagnose him, no one on here is doing that.

Are you saying that if we think he might be guilty, we shouldn’t wonder *why* he would have done it?  Or that we shouldn’t raise or discuss theories we think might be possible? Because we’re not experts? Or inquire other’s opinions on what they might think is possible? Because they’re not experts? What ever happened to freedom of speech?

“plant preconceptions” talk about speculation.